4x Circle http://4xcircle.com/ Thu, 04 Nov 2021 13:39:36 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://4xcircle.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/icon-120x120.jpg 4x Circle http://4xcircle.com/ 32 32 Charleston Reading Circle Shares Book Reviews | Entertainment https://4xcircle.com/charleston-reading-circle-shares-book-reviews-entertainment/ https://4xcircle.com/charleston-reading-circle-shares-book-reviews-entertainment/#respond Thu, 04 Nov 2021 11:30:00 +0000 https://4xcircle.com/charleston-reading-circle-shares-book-reviews-entertainment/ CHARLESTON – The Charleston Reading Circle began its 133rd year with a Zoom reunion on October 1. Members received gift bags to enjoy in lieu of fall tea. Lou Conwell reviewed the book “Exploring the Land of Lincoln: The Essential Guide to Illinois Historic Sites” by local author Charles Titus. Local writers featured at Past-Forward […]]]>

CHARLESTON – The Charleston Reading Circle began its 133rd year with a Zoom reunion on October 1. Members received gift bags to enjoy in lieu of fall tea.

Lou Conwell reviewed the book “Exploring the Land of Lincoln: The Essential Guide to Illinois Historic Sites” by local author Charles Titus.

Local writers featured at Past-Forward Memoir Live Reading

The book is a historical locator guide for the state of Illinois. It is organized chronologically and divided into four distinct regions: North, Center, South, and Chicago. The guide is easy to read and the author poetic in his descriptions. Titus wrote a short prologue for each section of the book to help place historic sites in the context of the events of history.

The book also contains an extremely well researched appendix which includes additional sites in areas the reader can explore and notes to encourage the reader to learn more. Many historic sites are close enough to be visited on a day trip from Charleston.

The second meeting of the year was organized by Zoom on October 15th. Carolyn Stephens reviewed the book “Confessions of a Sociopath: A Life Spent Hiding in Plain Sight” by ME Thomas.

This book is a memoir of a sociopath, a true story according to the best memories of the author whose pseudonym is Mrs. ME Thomas to protect her identity.

Her story is told through the prism of how the author sees the world, which includes her megalomania (seeking power and dominating others), her focus, and her lack of understanding of the inner world of others.

The book opened our eyes to how we label people with a personality disorder, which gives us a prejudicial judgment of that person and a judgment on how that person acts and will act in the future. . This is not a justified determination when you look at studies on personality disorders. You can’t judge a book by its cover.

Janice Kahl reviewed “DBT for Dummies” by Gillian Galen and Blaise Aguirre.

Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) describes one of the most popular – and effective – treatments for mental health problems resulting from uncontrollable emotions.

Combining elements of cognitive behavioral therapy with the oriental practice of mindfulness, DBT was initially used clinically to treat the suffering associated with borderline personality disorder, but has now been shown to be effective in many other conditions. non-clinical mental stress.

The practice of DBT can help those who face everything from daily challenges to severe psychological distress. This book and the ideas within its pages can help readers better regulate their emotions, interact effectively with people, deal with stressful situations, and use mindfulness in everyday life. It is certainly reading for anyone in these pandemic and polarized times.

The next Charleston Reading Circle meeting will be at 1:30 p.m. on Friday, November 5.

Luz Whittenbarger will criticize “Extra Life: A Short History of Living Longer” by Steven Johnson and Mary Helen Mertz will criticize “My Remarkable Journey” by Katherine Johnson.

For more information, contact Mary Jorstad at 217-871-5129.


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Fort Monmouth Barker Circle to become 75 apartments, restaurant https://4xcircle.com/fort-monmouth-barker-circle-to-become-75-apartments-restaurant/ https://4xcircle.com/fort-monmouth-barker-circle-to-become-75-apartments-restaurant/#respond Thu, 04 Nov 2021 09:02:06 +0000 https://4xcircle.com/fort-monmouth-barker-circle-to-become-75-apartments-restaurant/ OCEANPORT – A local developer has closed the historic Barker Circle property in Fort Monmouth for $ 4.85 million and will create a mixed-use site in the former army barracks that includes flat-style rental units, a restaurant , offices and spaces linked to art. Asbury Park-based Barker Circle Partnership LLC, which signed a contract to […]]]>

OCEANPORT – A local developer has closed the historic Barker Circle property in Fort Monmouth for $ 4.85 million and will create a mixed-use site in the former army barracks that includes flat-style rental units, a restaurant , offices and spaces linked to art.

Asbury Park-based Barker Circle Partnership LLC, which signed a contract to buy the 20-acre property two years ago, made the deal on Tuesday, the Fort Monmouth Economic Revitalization Authority said.

The group will invest around $ 22 million to reuse the historic property located at the Oceanport entrance to the fort.

While the Barker Circle redevelopment will generate tax revenue, jobs and new housing for Oceanport, FMERA Executive Director Bruce Steadman said “it will also activate one of the premium sites that once served as the destination. for visitors and those stationed at Fort Monmouth ”.

An aerial view of Barker Circle on the Oceanport side of Fort Monmouth.  A developer has purchased the site and will redevelop it by creating new residences, a restaurant, offices and an art space.

Light, camera, action: Netflix confirms bidding on Fort Monmouth’s ‘Mega Parcel’ for studio lot

Barker Circle currently has five barracks buildings, the fire station and Kaplan Hall, which was built in 1933 and was once the theater of the station with 574 seats. It was last used as a museum of communications and electronics. The buildings total 200,000 square feet of space.

The site is in the Historic District of the Fort Monmouth National Register and all seven buildings will be adaptively reused and are subject to New Jersey state historic preservation clauses, FMERA said.

The group’s plan provides for 75 residential units in four of the fire station buildings, an office building and restaurant, and arts-related uses in the fire station and Kaplan Hall. The development is expected to create 70 temporary construction jobs and 40 permanent jobs when completed.

A concept design for new residences at Barker Circle, a historic site on the Oceanport side of Fort Monmouth.  A developer has purchased the site and will redevelop it by creating new residences, a restaurant, offices and an art space.

The development group partners have already made a significant investment in the fort with The Loft project, where they are transforming the fort’s former dance hall into an event space with a small micro-brewery.

The property is located at the main entrance on the easternmost side of the fort and close to other completed projects such as the marina, the Fort Athletic Club, the former headquarters of the Russel Hall Garrison, which is now used by IT companies, and the recently refurbished former officer building housing the East Gate and Liberty Walk.

When Dan Radel, from Jersey Shore, doesn’t report the news, you can find him in a classroom where he is a history teacher. Join him @danielradelapp; 732-643-4072; dradel@gannettnj.com.


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Review: “The Missing Circle” delves into Latin America’s complex past https://4xcircle.com/review-the-missing-circle-delves-into-latin-americas-complex-past/ https://4xcircle.com/review-the-missing-circle-delves-into-latin-americas-complex-past/#respond Wed, 03 Nov 2021 23:39:17 +0000 https://4xcircle.com/review-the-missing-circle-delves-into-latin-americas-complex-past/ With numerous works in earth tone palettes and natural materials, “The Missing Circle” in Kadist (until January 8, 2022) connects nature, decadence and death with the transatlantic slave trade, political unrest , inequality and mass murder in Latin American Stories. While the exhibit nicely presents many Latin American artists and the region’s complex histories, it […]]]>

With numerous works in earth tone palettes and natural materials, “The Missing Circle” in Kadist (until January 8, 2022) connects nature, decadence and death with the transatlantic slave trade, political unrest , inequality and mass murder in Latin American Stories. While the exhibit nicely presents many Latin American artists and the region’s complex histories, it also raises questions about who is allowed to represent global narratives, although the organization refrains from exhibiting primarily works. from its own collection.

Among the strongest works in the exhibition, the brightly colored drawing by Jorge Julián Aristizábal breaks with the muted color and poetics of much of the exhibition. Exploiting a complicated space between illustration and documents from the colonial era, Aristizába boldly depicts the Colombian massacre of El Aro in 1997. In the densely detailed drawing, a verdant hill is dotted with decapitated heads, helicopters, bags of money and paramilitary troops with guns. Aristizábal explicitly names the places with colorful flags and identifies key paramilitary operatives, like Salvatore Mancuso and Carlos Castaño, by hand in cursive and in portraits flanking the sides of the images. At the top center of the drawing, Aristizábal places a portrait of Álvaro Uribe Vélez, then governor of Antiquia and Colombian president 2002-2010. With strings attached to Uribe’s fingers, like a puppeteer, the artist presents a direct criticism despite the playful aspect of the work.

Jorge Julián Aristizábal, “The Massacre of El Aro”, 2017, watercolor and mixed media on paper

Moving on from the metaphor of the political puppet, Carlos Amorales’s striking black and white 2017 film La aldea maldita (The cursed village) uses simplistic cut-out puppets to tell about a family as they move to a village and get lynched. With extremely straightforward production levels, devoid of complicated post-production and CGI magic, Amorales establishes palpable tension as the family slowly weaves their way through a dark forest while ominous characters lurk in the background. Like bird calls or a choppy computerized sound, the soundtrack of Amorales’ whistles suggests communication, which at the bottom of the screen seems to translate into a simplified form of pre-Columbian writing. As the family is attacked, the camera returns to a context shot that reveals five musicians frantically playing around the set. Like the haunting fables of Brother’s Grim, Amorales’ simple cut-and-paper game poignantly balances a franchise with code language against a gruesome event.

Carlos Amorales, ‘Negative Nature (Puppet Masters),’ 2018, acrylic spray paint and cardboard

While the first two galleries contextualize the works of many Latin American artists on a range of subjects, the exhibition merges rather disjointedly into the third gallery on-site, particularly Chile’s Atacama Desert. In addition to its difficult geography, Atacama is the place where Augusto Pinochet brutally cast and executed many political rivals and dissidents, which was powerfully addressed in “Nostalgia for the Light” by Chilean filmmaker Patricio Guzmán (2010). With works by French artist Pierre Huyghe; Romaetti Costales, the collaborative duo of French artist Julia Rometti and Belarusian artist Victor Costales (based in Mexico City); and the only Chilean artist Cristóbal Lehyt, Atacama is represented in photography, sculpture and drawing which explore this deterioration of the body and nature, especially through bones.

Naufus Ramírez Figueroa, ‘Guardian 2’ 2018, carved mahogany wood

While this is a striking image, Huyghe’s “Dead Indian Hill” (2016) is particularly problematic. While the image depicts the skeletal remains of a suspected miner from Atacama, Huyghe ventures to exploit the tragedy of others. Additionally, as with Huyghe’s work based on the Fukushima nuclear fusion, this work appears to be another example of the global art star changing shape and parachuting into places with no personal investment in the room. .

While many of the detailed stories invoked in the “missing circle” may be unknown to San Francisco viewers, it creates conversations and forces us to go beyond our comfort level and knowledge. With many artists from all over Latin America or with connections to Latin Caribbean history, with the exception of Huyghe, the exhibition sensitively considered the importance of fatherhood within a global artistic community.

“THE MISSING CIRCLE” runs through January 8, 2022 in Kadist, SF. More info here.


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Circle Craft Christmas Market ready to bloom https://4xcircle.com/circle-craft-christmas-market-ready-to-bloom/ https://4xcircle.com/circle-craft-christmas-market-ready-to-bloom/#respond Wed, 03 Nov 2021 23:27:11 +0000 https://4xcircle.com/circle-craft-christmas-market-ready-to-bloom/ People go to craft fairs mainly for two reasons. One is the chance to find unique, high-quality products at shows such as the Circle Craft Christmas Market, which takes place at the Vancouver Convention Center West (1055 Canada Place) from November 10-14. “The excitement is you don’t walk into Walmart or the Gap or most […]]]>

People go to craft fairs mainly for two reasons.

One is the chance to find unique, high-quality products at shows such as the Circle Craft Christmas Market, which takes place at the Vancouver Convention Center West (1055 Canada Place) from November 10-14.

“The excitement is you don’t walk into Walmart or the Gap or most of the big box stores where you buy whatever everyone else is buying,” Peter Harbic told the Law during a telephone interview.

Harbic describes himself as a producer of shows with Signatures Shows Ltd. His company took over management of the annual Christmas Fair through a licensing agreement with Circle Craft Co-operative, an artist-run organization in Vancouver.

“You are buying something really cool and nobody else has it,” Harbic said of the appeal of shows featuring handmade items.

The second reason people go to these fairs is the chance to meet the artisans who create distinctive products.

“They have a story about where they come from and what inspired them to do their creative work, whether it be, you know, fine art or fashion or whatever,” Harbic said.

He noted that such a person could be “the eclectic artist who lives in Salt Spring. [Island] or Gabrielle [Island] or Courtenay or more in Tofino or Prince George or in the middle of Saskatchewan ”.

“They come out of their caves once a year to sell their stuff. They go on tour for two months, and they spend the year preparing for it, ”Harbic said.

Cosman & Webb’s organic maple syrup from the Townships comes straight from Quebec.

The first Circle Craft Christmas market was held at The Cultch in East Vancouver

in 1973. It has since become a tradition in the city, kicking off shopping for the holiday season.

The fair had a hiatus in 2020 due to COVID-19. Harbic noted that the economic impact of the pandemic on artisans has been “horrific”.

With its return this year, the Circle Craft Christmas Market will offer manufacturers across Canada the opportunity to showcase their products. “It has been a quiet and dark time and we are thriving again,” said Harbic.

This year’s show will feature 200 artisans, including 40 new exhibitors. As Harbic noted, artisans come in many different forms, from clothing designers, potters, jewelers, carpenters and metallurgists, glassblowers, candle and soap makers. or culinary artists.
Speaking of artisanal cuisine, the Christmas market will include a so-called gourmet alley. Harbic said visitors can find everything from salsas and sauces, to chocolates and pâté.

A Taste of the Okanagan gourmet condiments and savory spreads are available at Circle Craft.

The Circle Craft Co-operative says on its website that it has made the decision in 2020 to focus on its member artists and the group’s boutique on Granville Island.

The organization sought a partner to manage its Christmas market and founded Signatures Shows, a Canadian company founded in 1980 by glassblower John Ladouceur and jeweler Casey Sadaka.

Many members of the Circle Craft Co-operative participate in the show, including potters Gordon Hutchens and Cathi Jefferson, both of whom will be doing demonstrations on the potter’s wheel.

Proof of full COVID-19 vaccination is required for visitors.

Following


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FMERA sells historic Fort Monmouth Barker Circle https://4xcircle.com/fmera-sells-historic-fort-monmouth-barker-circle/ https://4xcircle.com/fmera-sells-historic-fort-monmouth-barker-circle/#respond Wed, 03 Nov 2021 16:32:21 +0000 https://4xcircle.com/fmera-sells-historic-fort-monmouth-barker-circle/ Entrance to the Johnson Gate in Fort Monmouth. Former army barracks, fire station and museum planned for mixed-use redevelopment November 3, 2021 The Fort Monmouth Economic Revitalization Authority (FMERA) sold Barker Circle to Barker Circle Partnership, LLC (BCP) for nearly $ 5 million. Barker Circle is an approximately 20-acre site that includes seven buildings, four […]]]>

Entrance to the Johnson Gate in Fort Monmouth.

Former army barracks, fire station and museum planned for mixed-use redevelopment

The Fort Monmouth Economic Revitalization Authority (FMERA) sold Barker Circle to Barker Circle Partnership, LLC (BCP) for nearly $ 5 million. Barker Circle is an approximately 20-acre site that includes seven buildings, four of which served as barracks, as well as Kaplan Hall, the former Army Communications and Electronics Command Museum and Fort’s main barracks. Monmouth. The property is located along the Avenue of Memories and Oceanport Way in Oceanport, in the historic Fort Monmouth National Register district. The sale of the property took place on November 2.

BCP bought the Barker Circle site for $ 4.85 million after being selected as the most qualified proponent for the property. The developer’s plans for Barker Circle include 75 residential units in four barracks buildings, an office building and restaurant, and arts-related uses in the Fire Hall and Kaplan Hall, respectively. All seven buildings will be adaptively reused and are subject to New Jersey State Historic Preservation Covenants. FMERA anticipates that BCP will invest more than $ 22 million in the project, which will result in the creation of 70 construction and / or temporary jobs and 40 permanent jobs.

“Barker Circle is at the eastern entrance to the Oceanport and Eatontown sections of Fort Monmouth. Comprised of 20 acres and some 200,000 square feet of historic buildings, it is a pivotal project for the development of the fort, ”said a spokesperson for the Barker Circle Partnership. “The procuring entity presents its plans to the Ocean Port Planning Board later this month.”

The project is located at the main entrance on the easternmost side of the fort and close to other completed and planned residential projects. It’s also near a mix of commercial and retail uses, including the Marina, Park Loft, and the Fort Athletic Club (former fitness center).

“The redevelopment of Barker Circle will not only provide high-end residential units to a high-demand community, but will also generate essential tax revenue for the Borough of Oceanport,” said Bruce Steadman, Executive Director of FMERA . “It will also activate one of the premium sites that once served as a destination for visitors and those stationed in Fort Monmouth.”

Steadman noted that the level of development underway at the Fort is testament to the continued strength of the market and the optimal location of the property in Monmouth County.

“We are excited about BCP’s redevelopment plans for Barker Circle,” said Sarah Giberson, Director of Marketing and Development, FMERA. “This developer has already made a significant investment in the Fort with The Loft project and we expect to see the same level of considerable attention and ingenuity employed in the redesign of these historic buildings.”

Over the past two years, several residential projects have been completed including East Gate and Liberty Walk by RPM Development in Oceanport; Patriots Square and Anthem Place, by Lennar in Tinton Falls. Residential demand at the fort and surrounding communities remains strong.

Background

The Fort Monmouth redevelopment is a multi-year reinvestment and reallocation of a former military installation that was America’s leader in satellite and telecommunications technology. The primary objective of the Fort Monmouth Reuse and Redevelopment Plan (the “Reuse Plan”) is to reallocate and return the fort to a vibrant environment, create jobs and catalyze economic growth in each of the three municipalities. hosts (Tinton Falls, Eatontown, and Oceanport) and area. The Reuse Plan strives to balance development with the protection and enhancement of natural resources, while creating a complete ecosystem with 21st century business, culture and life.

The fort had five million square feet of construction area, 70 percent of which is intended for demolition. Almost 80 percent of the Fort’s 1,126 acres are sold, under contract, through negotiations or through the request for proposals process. To date, FMERA has sold 30 plots, and a further seven plots are under contract or have contracts approved by the Council.

FMERA is an independent state authority created to oversee the redevelopment of the site and the implementation of the fort reuse plan, which envisions a specific reinvestment that aligns with the economic development objectives of each community.

To access more business news, visit NJB News Now.

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3 art gallery exhibitions to see right now https://4xcircle.com/3-art-gallery-exhibitions-to-see-right-now/ https://4xcircle.com/3-art-gallery-exhibitions-to-see-right-now/#respond Wed, 03 Nov 2021 15:59:35 +0000 https://4xcircle.com/3-art-gallery-exhibitions-to-see-right-now/ Shannon Cartier Lucie Until November 14. Lubov, 5 East Broadway, Ste. 402, Manhattan. 347-496-5833; lubov.nyc. When Nashville-born artist Shannon Cartier Lucy, who had previously had success with a conceptual practice, reappeared last year after a decade of absence from the art world, it was with a crisp, realistic style. . This exhibition is his second […]]]>

Until November 14. Lubov, 5 East Broadway, Ste. 402, Manhattan. 347-496-5833; lubov.nyc.

When Nashville-born artist Shannon Cartier Lucy, who had previously had success with a conceptual practice, reappeared last year after a decade of absence from the art world, it was with a crisp, realistic style. . This exhibition is his second in Lubov, a small gallery in a worn out walk-up in Chinatown whose office remains make it look like previous tenants have fled in the middle of the night. The frame adds to the transparency quality of Lucy’s paintings.

Bright scenes of unease – a girl eating with too large cutlery and uncomfortably; a nurse inspecting a dose of blueberries, her face veiled behind a canvas; a self-portrait of the artist after falling face first, somehow still sitting in a dining chair – suggests reanimated trauma in new forms. A vague fear is softened by a delicate palette, like a hot bath taken during a session. The obliquity is presented as obvious, as in “A New Pack”, four pairs of white cotton briefs spread out with obsessive precision on a threadbare carpet. “After a great pain, a formal feeling comes” from Emily Dickinson would be an appropriate accompaniment (“The Nerves sit ceremonious, like Tombs -”).

A claustrophobic air fills the frames, as in “Loblolly Pine,” a pine cone suspended in a drinking glass whose mouth is sealed by someone’s palm, both suffocation and divination. All the images here take place in a domestic setting, and their action comes up against the oppression of their interior walls. The clarity of Lucy’s imagery is clouded by an emotional obscurity which may be interpreted as elusive or difficult to analyze, but neither are the day-to-day affairs of life and its meaning.

MAX LAKIN


Until November 13. Karma, 188 and 172 East Second Street, Manhattan. 212-390-8290, karmakarma.org.

Tehran-born painter Manoucher Yektai came to New York in 1945 and had his first solo exhibition at the Grace Borgenicht Gallery in the early 1950s. With the exception of a few extended stays in Paris, he remained here, painting, until his death at the age of 97 in 2019. A large study of his oils in Karma, in the East Village, includes paintings just after this first solo exhibition. until 2002, and throughout you can watch him wrestle with the still life. Taking up elements of abstract expressionism without ever completely letting go of the representation, he simplifies, exaggerates and twists the fruits and flowers almost to the point of breaking. An untitled play from around 1961 first struck me like a cartoon fairy snowball fight, with multicolored circles and force lines zigzagging in all directions.

He also applies paint so thick that it casts shadows, further upsetting your sense of scale. In his 1976 “Still Life with Cantaloupe”, a white vase with blue contours is placed on a bloody pink table, against a beige curtain, supporting a group of large green lines. In a nearby bowl are a dozen fruits with colors as vivid and distinct as Crayola pencils. The impasto in this extreme usually comes with a sort of sensuality, but in this case the overall effect is distinctly dry. Yektai left sections of blank canvas on either side of her figure, and even the painting itself, unvarnished and vigorously scraped across the surface, looks oddly ascetic.

HEINRICH


Until December 18. Cristin Tierney Gallery, 219 Bowery, second floor, Manhattan; (212) 594-0550, cristintierney.com.

Over the course of two days in November 2019, hundreds of blacks marched 24 miles from LaPlace to New Orleans for freedom. They weren’t protesting – or maybe they were, in a way, participants in a socially engaged performance piece of art called “Slave Rebellion Reenactment.” Designed by artist Dread Scott, the play was a recreation of the German Coast Uprising of 1811, a revolt of hundreds of slaves in the territory of Orleans (now Louisiana). It was the biggest slave uprising in US history, but many Americans don’t know about it. With his ambitious work, Scott – who uses art to stage confrontations with the realities of injustice – attempted to reclaim it.

“Slave Rebellion Reenactment” debuts in the gallery as an exhibition titled after one of the protesters’ chants: “We are going to end slavery. Join us! ”The show is too small to properly represent such a formidable project, but the six full-scale photographs and three hand-made flags offer a glimpse into the power of the performance. We see black actors in costumes. period move with passionate determination. Such images of black resistance and liberation seem to fill a historical gap, as a type of image too rarely shown in public. Yet in some photos the march takes place in a modern context of highways and oil refineries – pieces of infrastructure often constructed expressly to harm communities of color and perpetuate racism. They are a stark reminder that even if slavery has ended, it will take much more work and imagination to dismantle its legacy.

JILLIAN STEINHAUER


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Artist Sedrick Huckaby’s project celebrates collaboration https://4xcircle.com/artist-sedrick-huckabys-project-celebrates-collaboration/ https://4xcircle.com/artist-sedrick-huckabys-project-celebrates-collaboration/#respond Tue, 02 Nov 2021 23:19:00 +0000 https://4xcircle.com/artist-sedrick-huckabys-project-celebrates-collaboration/ FORT WORTH, Texas – Internationally renowned artists hope a century-old home in the predominantly black and Latin neighborhood of Fort Worth Polytechnic can uplift a community. Sedrick and Letitia Huckaby have announced the opening of Kinfolk House, a community-driven collaborative art space that once housed Sedrick’s grandmother. What would you like to know Artists Sedrick […]]]>

FORT WORTH, Texas – Internationally renowned artists hope a century-old home in the predominantly black and Latin neighborhood of Fort Worth Polytechnic can uplift a community. Sedrick and Letitia Huckaby have announced the opening of Kinfolk House, a community-driven collaborative art space that once housed Sedrick’s grandmother.


What would you like to know

  • Artists Sedrick and Letitia Huckaby created Kinfolk house, a collaborative art space located in the Polytechnic district of Fort Worth
  • The space is the former home of Sedrick’s grandmother
  • The Huckaby’s want Kinfolk to become a hub of creativity in a traditionally underserved area
  • The gallery’s first exhibition will take place in February and will feature a collaboration between Sedrick and Letitia Huckaby

Sedrick Huckaby, professor at UTA and, notably, professor of art to former President George W. Bush, said that he and his wife hope to cultivate a space where ideas are free-form, and the idea of art is not limited to the traditional custodians of fine art, such as painters, sculptors and installations.

“The space is going to be a collaborative art space where creatives come together and collaborate – and ‘creatives’ include beautiful artists, but not limited to,” he said at a telephone interview. “Thus, it is possible for a painter, a poet and a fashion designer to come together and create some kind of exhibition, show or collaborative project.

“For example, one of the things I see is that there are all types of artists, and even some people don’t even call themselves artists, but they have an artistic spirit,” a- he continued. “I think that having kind of a space where the creatives can come together and play together is something that I think will be of great benefit to our region.”

Huckaby said that in creating the space, he hoped to pay homage to his grandmother’s legacy of creativity and community.

“From my perspective, she was a pretty creative person,” he said. “She wasn’t an artist or anything, she was just creative in her thought and in her life. And when I got the place about 12 years ago, I was thinking about how to honor that spirit of creativity as an artist. Over the years, I have met so many different types of creative people. And that’s usually where the thinking comes from.

1913 Wallace Street, by Sedrick Huckaby.

Huckaby discovered his love for art at a young age. He has participated in several non-profit civic initiatives, such as Imagination Celebration. It was through this program that he met his longtime teacher and mentor, Ron Tomlinson, who was a professor at Texas Wesleyan University.

Huckaby followed Tomlinson to Wesleyan, and the young artist was eventually accepted to the prestigious Yale School of Art for graduate study.

One of Kinfolk House’s goals, Huckaby said, is to make the art world accessible to those unaware of its notoriously cliquey inner circles. While programs like Imagine Celebration still exist, people who live in areas like Poly are often unaware of them.

“I think it’s important that these types of creative spaces occur in communities that are outside of the arts district,” he said. “It’s just important for people to see creativity springing up in their own communities and in other areas that are outside of these spaces that we consider. [the art world]. We shouldn’t draw a line around these spaces and call them “the art space”. Art comes from everywhere.

The Huckaby’s have appointed Jessica Fuentes as director of Kinfolk House. She has varied experience as an artist, arts administrator and educator. Beyond that, she brings values ​​and ideas that they hope will be reflected at Kinfolk House. Fuentes was the Director of School and Community Outreach for the Amon Carter Museum of American Art and was a member of the F6 Gallery Collective and the 500x Gallery. She worked at the Dallas Museum of Art, serves on the board of directors of Make Art with Purpose (MAP), Artes de la Rosa, and the educational planning committee for the Smithsonian Latino Center in Washington, DC, between others.

“It’s rare to have the opportunity to help build a space from scratch that truly matches your vision and personal goals,” she said. “Throughout my journey in museum education, I have worked to create accessible and relevant exhibits, experiences and self-guided learning programs. Kinfolk House will be a place that supports artists, celebrates community, is informed and invested in the local neighborhood, and inspires creativity, dialogue and reflection.

Kinfolk House to host grand opening with multimedia project in February a collaboration between the founders Sedrick and Letitia focused on the concepts of family, community and heritage.


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What is Circle Craft 2021 and what will the Tri-City businesses be? https://4xcircle.com/what-is-circle-craft-2021-and-what-will-the-tri-city-businesses-be/ https://4xcircle.com/what-is-circle-craft-2021-and-what-will-the-tri-city-businesses-be/#respond Thu, 21 Oct 2021 20:54:00 +0000 https://4xcircle.com/what-is-circle-craft-2021-and-what-will-the-tri-city-businesses-be/ A popular Christmas market in Vancouver is back for in-person shopping. And eight Tri-City companies are expected to display and sell their products at Circle Craft, which runs Nov. 10-14 at the Vancouver Convention Center West. A popular Christmas market in Vancouver is back for in-person shopping. And eight Tri-City companies are expected to display […]]]>

A popular Christmas market in Vancouver is back for in-person shopping. And eight Tri-City companies are expected to display and sell their products at Circle Craft, which runs Nov. 10-14 at the Vancouver Convention Center West.

A popular Christmas market in Vancouver is back for in-person shopping.

And eight Tri-City companies are expected to display and sell their products at Circle Craft, which runs Nov. 10-14 at the Vancouver Convention Center West.

They are:

Coquitlam

  • Grass mountain pottery
  • Canvas candle company
  • Swirling spoons
  • Artisanal van

Port Coquitlam

  • Premium Foods Infusion
  • Oladesign

Port Moody

  • BLINK Chocolate
  • RECVRD Candle Co.

Postponed to 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Circle Craft Christmas Market will see 200 artisans for this year’s edition, including more than 40 new vendors such as clothing designers, potters, jewelers, laborers wood and metal, glassblowers and candles. and soap makers.

Selected by a jury on the basis of their talents and diversity, the artists come from all over Quebec, but some also come from as far away as Montreal; Toronto; Calgary; Winnipeg; Halifax; Milo, Alberta; Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan; and Cowansville, Quebec.

Launched in 1972, Circle Craft is run by an artists’ cooperative in British Columbia and sees thousands of buyers visit downtown Vancouver each year.

• Circle Craft is open Wednesday through Friday from 10 am to 9 pm; Saturday from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission is $ 15 and $ 12, with no charge for children 12 and under. There is a half-price reduction for entries after 5 p.m. on Wednesday, Thursday and Friday. Proof of vaccination and face masks are required to attend. For more information, we encourage you to visit the Circle Craft website.


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Joni Mitchell’s song “The Circle Game” as a childhood hymn in college https://4xcircle.com/joni-mitchells-song-the-circle-game-as-a-childhood-hymn-in-college/ https://4xcircle.com/joni-mitchells-song-the-circle-game-as-a-childhood-hymn-in-college/#respond Wed, 15 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://4xcircle.com/joni-mitchells-song-the-circle-game-as-a-childhood-hymn-in-college/ In his song “The Circle Game”, Joni Mitchell tells the story of a child who becomes an adult, expressing the inevitability of time and growth. It’s a popular camp song, which I had a love-hate relationship with throughout my early years. The melody was pleasant, but the chorus, which is repeated after each phase of […]]]>

In his song “The Circle Game”, Joni Mitchell tells the story of a child who becomes an adult, expressing the inevitability of time and growth. It’s a popular camp song, which I had a love-hate relationship with throughout my early years. The melody was pleasant, but the chorus, which is repeated after each phase of the child’s life, had corresponding dance movements. The choreography, in which everyone participated, asked me to get up from my comfortable position in the grass. During this time, I was thinking less of “being captive on the carousel of time” – as the lyrics detailed – and more of being captive in a boring cycle of getting up and sitting down. For that reason alone, “The Circle Game” and I were touch and go.

Of course, when I was eight, my entire career in the camp was touch and go. I was an anxious and fearful child who could only get on the camp bus because my twin sister was excited about the idea. I didn’t want to stay in the dust, so even though I wasn’t ready, I went to the camp. Every morning, as soon as my eyes opened in my designated bunk bed, I focused my attention on my bedside window. I kept them locked there until I spotted my manager Gabe and his dog Brooklyn as they made their way to the office for the morning management team meeting. As soon as they hit my line of sight, I catapult myself out of bed with unstoppable energy propelling myself out of the cabin. From that moment until the rest of the day, I would sit in Gabe’s office and cry.

Sometimes I was pushed to spread my wings and, dare I say it, to leave the office. I wandered aimlessly around the camp, always crying to anyone who wanted to listen to me or maybe even to myself. Although humorous now, it was a tragic sight back then. Yet in hindsight, the scene also miraculously mirrors Joni Mitchell’s portrayal of the young child: “Yesterday a child went out to wander… scared when the sky was full of thunder and in tears at a star’s fall. “


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Art gallery of the Cercle Sacré Ballard – My Ballard https://4xcircle.com/art-gallery-of-the-cercle-sacre-ballard-my-ballard/ https://4xcircle.com/art-gallery-of-the-cercle-sacre-ballard-my-ballard/#respond Sat, 10 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://4xcircle.com/art-gallery-of-the-cercle-sacre-ballard-my-ballard/ Sacred Circle Ballard Art GalleryInauguration and introduction of the new Daybreak Star radio network Seattle, WA, United States July 10, 2021. The United Indians of All Tribes Foundation opens its third physical location in Ballard. They will help launch the Daybreak Star Radio Network (DBSRN) which will officially air on July 10, 2021. The public […]]]>

Sacred Circle Ballard Art Gallery
Inauguration and introduction of the new Daybreak Star radio network

Seattle, WA, United States July 10, 2021. The United Indians of All Tribes Foundation opens its third physical location in Ballard. They will help launch the Daybreak Star Radio Network (DBSRN) which will officially air on July 10, 2021. The public is invited to celebrate the occasion and explore the art gallery and radio station. The event will begin at 1:00 p.m. at the Sacred Circle Art Gallery Ballard, 5337 Ballard Ave NW, Seattle, WA 98107.

The Sacred Circle Art Gallery and DBSRN are both programs of the United Indians of All Tribes Foundation, a Washington nonprofit and a 501 (c) (3). Founded in 1970, the United Indians of All Tribes Foundation provides a wide range of culturally appropriate services and programs to the urban Indigenous community of Seattle and King County. DJ BigRez will be playing live Native American music during the grand opening from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.

The Sacred Circle Art Gallery Ballard is a hybrid offshoot of the Sacred Circle Gallery at the Daybreak Star Indian Cultural Center in Discovery Park. This new location will feature rotating Native American and Native artists from the local community and beyond. This new space will allow new and emerging artists and artisans to be presented in the Gallery’s gift space.

Daybreak Star Radio Network is an app-based internet radio station that offers music programming ranging from traditional native flute and drums to rock, hip-hop, EDM, and more. Daybreak Star will rise up and expose the world to the NDN music and culture that has survived, developed, and grown.

About the United Indians of All Tribes Foundation
Our mission is to provide educational, cultural, linguistic and musical programs that reconnect Indigenous peoples to their heritage by strengthening their sense of belonging and importance as Indigenous peoples.

Media contact: Vera Maldonado, artistic program director vmaldonado@unitedindians.org 206-507-9681

Media contact: Harris Francis, Program Director Hfrancis@unitedindians.org 206-829-2210 www.DayBreakStarRadio.com


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